Find out the most effective way to grow food in your garden with uniform rows and inexpensive drip irrigation.

In this video, I walk you through the design of a simple manifold configuration that I came up with for row crops, homestead gardens, and market gardeners.

You’ll discover how to maximize low flow systems while saving thousands of dollars on your water bill. And how to overcome challenges of low flow wells on your property.

This simple system is designed to allow you to avoid irregular watering schedules and maximize the potential of your food production.

Grab the Irrigation Design Plans Here ( <– download the PDF)

Products used in this video:
Orbit Automatic Timer: http://amzn.to/2ogRy3m
Extra Valves: http://amzn.to/2oJKCfZ
Gerber Centerdrive Multi-Tool: http://amzn.to/2oReIew
Mini Tripod: http://amzn.to/2nSZwN2

STANDARD EQUIPMENT:
I use the Sony Digital Voice Recorder: http://amzn.to/2cRFcXC

The quality of the GoPro HERO3+ is adequate for my needs: http://amzn.to/2cRF8Hn

Gimbal Stabilizer for GoPro: http://amzn.to/2e1MAVu

When needing a second camera shoot or really high end, I use the Canon EOS 5D Mark II: http://amzn.to/2cfJsnK

I piece it all together using Adobe Premiere Pro CC on a Macbook Pro and After Affects.


Dobro Mash by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Artist: http://audionautix.com/

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